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Japanese is spread across Indian languages in many forms

June 29, 2012

Mohan, mdashf


[read with many such articles written over the year about Japanese and Indian languages, if you are interested]

Do you know the Japanese particle [go no joshi] “te” or “tte” is also exactly so in Odia? nemutte iru (Jap) Soitte jiba (Odia), neitte jibi.

“tte” makes them a “while verb”. while the action is occuring. “tte” is also used as nouns because the other verb making forms makes life easy, samaste=everyone, namaste=honor [in Japanese subete=everyone, look how close. also Indian words for everyone is sarbe, sabhien, sabu etc which are just variants of sa and ba consonants] Also note namaste has a very related meaning here I had described in one of my article a year ago. [I will try to add this later, but you can search for the article by using some search parameter such as ” nembutsu or narayanamu “] and note subete has another close variant in Odia sabuta [exclamation towards everyone]

Unfortunate not just the “tte” particle but many particles of Japanese are found in many different languages of India which are considered village-speech. eg in Hindi “ka” the question denoter of Japanese is exactly so but considered village speech. In Odia “tte” the while-verb particle is also exactly so in Japanese but is considered village-speech.

The “ra” particle of Japanese is exactly so in Odia [I call it a plural maker, I make life easy like anything but you must be patient]

There are many more particles. And I am wondering why “ma” in Japanese is not considered a particle or is it? Ari-masu is like “ma” a reference for Ari and su is the verb-maker. just like sou desu de is the particle and su is the verb form.  [its the same u vowel that makes verbs in Odia]

Its this ma which is a “to/towards” reference in Hindi  but in so called village-speech. also its variants “me” is a famous particle in Hindi. This particle “me” is used as “in” reference. [also as “to” reference]

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